Upcoming Webcast: Road Rage: Countering Vehicular Weaponization Through Urban Transportation Design Strategies

May 24, 2018, 12:00PM (ET)

Road Rage: Countering Vehicular Weaponization Through Urban Transportation Design Strategies

This session focuses on what transportation administrators in the United States say they are doing to address and mitigate the threat of vehicular weaponization through planning decisions, public engagement, and networking with overlapping units of government. The presentation includes information on the past incidences of vehicular terrorism globally, an examination of ranges of approaches to the threat, as well as a critical examination of the effects of various approaches on urban life, walkability, and bikeability.

Presenters: Gerard C. Wellman, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Politics & Public Administration, California State University; and Josephine K. Hazelton, Graduate Student, California State University

Gerard C. Wellman is an Associate Professor of Public Administration at California State University, Stanislaus in Northern California. Receiving his PhD from the University of Nebraska in 2011, Gerard’s primary research interests revolve around questions of equity and justice in transportation and mobility planning, specifically with regard to public and active transportation and the negative societal effects of car-centric urban planning. His recent publications can be found in Public Administration Quarterly, Public Works Management & Policy, Journal of Community Development, and, of course, the Journal of Public Transportation. When not spending time with his three young sons, Gerard enjoys gardening, running half marathons, and exploring California’s beautiful landscape.

Josephine K. Hazelton is a graduate student in the Master of Public Administration program at California State University, Stanislaus. She has previously spent time working in Washington, D.C. for a Member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Josephine’s research interests include public and active transportation policy, environmental justice, urban sprawl, and feminist theory in relationship to space and place. Her most recent work explores transportation inequity in California’s Central Valley.

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